10 Secret Places That Will Make You Fall In Love With New York

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Why do you love NYC? Of course it’s for the things that make it unique. It has to be, otherwise you’d love EVERY city, and you don. You love New York. If you are feeling the shine wear off of the big apple then these are the things that make New York City unique. The curiosities that live around every corner that remind us all that we live in the greatest city in the world. Enjoy:

1. Grand Central Station’s Whispering Gallery
[Anne|flickr]
[Anne|flickr]

In front of the Oyster Bar and Restaurant in Grand Central Terminal is the famous a whisper archway. Here you can experience an weird sound focusing effect. If you and a friend stand at diagonal arches, you will be able to hear each other’s whispers transmitted through the arch. It’s really quite freaky.

2. The Tabernacle of Prayer Church
[afterthefinalcurtain]
[afterthefinalcurtain]

Jamaica Ave, Queens, holds one of the greatest secret jewels of the city. It’s not uncommon to see old movie theaters re-purposed into gyms, churches or pharmacies, but Tabernacle of Prayer church is something very different and special.  From stunningly ornate facade to the mind-blowing interior you see in the image above, it’s hard to believe you’re in NYC and not on some distant foreign shore.

3. The Masstransiscope Subway Mural

If you regularly travel the B or Q train from DeKalb Avenue to Manhattan, then you’re no stranger to the Masstransiscope Subway Mural… but blink and you’ll miss it, it only takes 15-17 seconds to pass it completely. Go check it out now if you haven’t seen it before it gets tagged-to-death.

4. Secret train tracks underneath the Waldorf Astoria

dc88bc4c83e1064fac42bd49f4b6c0e6
[pinterest]
This sounds like the original Bat Cave! Before the time of private jets and stretch limos with tinted windows, if you were a celebrity and you wanted to arrive in style or in secret you’d do it by rail. Yes once upon-a-time private trains stations were today’s private jets… and while we’re on the subject of private jests…

5. 77 Water Street Rooftop

[wirednewyork]
[wirednewyork]
When you think “Wall Street” you probably think of high finance, bankers… or maybe Micheal Douglas. While most who work in the financial district may dream of one day owning a private airplane they they probably don’t want that plane to be a non -functioning replica of a WW1 fighter plane. Shame, because that’s exactly what is sitting on the rooftop of 77 Water Street.

6. The Berlin Wall

[untappedcities]
[untappedcities]
In a corporate Midtown public plaza stands a relic of the Cold War era. What once separated communist East Germany from West now stands as public art for people on their lunch break. If you want to see a real slice of recent history, head on over to see this section of the Berlin wall.

7. Morbid Anatomy Museum

Morbid
[loveisspeed.blogspot]
This nonprofit museum in Brooklyn is definitely worth visiting, though perhaps wait a few hours after eating. With regularly changing exhibitions from both private and public collections, the Morbid Anatomy Museum deserves a lot more attention than it gets… although, if the morbid and the macabre isn’t your thing then perhaps you’ll want to wait in the gift shop.

8. The Submarine in Coney Island Creek
[nytimes.com]
[nytimes.com]

Yes, you read it correctly, there’s an abandoned submarine in Coney Island Creek… and yes, that’s right Beatles fans, it’s yellow.  The 45-foot vessel was built from salvaged metal some forty years ago by Jerry Bianco, a local shipyard worker, and stands a few hundred yards from the southern shore of the creek. “Quester I”, the ships original name, was designed to raise the Andrea Doria, an ocean liner that went down in the Atlantic Ocean in 1956. Obviously… it didn’t make it.

9. The Mott Haven Substation

mott-haven-substation
[thrillist]
What looks like a normal row of fancy houses to visitors is actually more than meets the eye. Bronx residents know there’s a secret inside, a Con Edison Substation. Built in 2007, and looking like expensive housing, what’s inside is actually keeping all the neighborhood lights on.

10. The Old City Hall Subway Stop

spots
[pondly]
 This stop closed in 1945 due to its inability to be modernized, along with the low amount of traffic it received. Tours are sometimes available. There’s actually a number of other closed stops throughout the city. You can catch a glimpse of the station as the 6 train passes the last stop and loops around.
Accessibility: Closed to the public.

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